Chlamydia, Gonorrhea and HPV
Knowing your numbers
Sexual and Reproductive health
Chlamydia, Gonorrhea and HPV
  Chlamydia, Gonorrhea and HPV  
 

Chlamydia

Most people who have chlamydia don’t know it since the disease often has no symptoms.
Chlamydia is the most commonly reported STD in the United States.
 Sexually active females 25 years old and younger need testing every year.
Easy to cure, chlamydia can impact a woman’s ability to have children if left untreated.

Source: Centers for Disease Control 2010

 

Gonorrhea

Anyone who is sexually active can get gonorrhea.
 If they occur, symptoms in men and women vary depending on what part of the body is infected: Gonorrhea can affect the anus, eyes, mouth, genitals, or throat.
This disease can impact a woman’s ability to have children if left untreated.

Source: Centers for Disease Control 2010

 

Human Papillomavirus

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a complicated health issue because there is so much misinformation surrounding it. Unlike Gonorrhea and Chlamydia sexual intercourse is not necessary to transmit the virus. Simple skin to skin contact is enough. Many people feel that they are protected against all STDs because they use a condom. Condoms do protect for the areas covered by the condom but there are no devices at present that will prevent contact in the entire pelvic region.

There may be no signs and symptoms to warn that HPV is present. That means the virus can be passed on without knowing it.

According to the CDC an estimated 75% of males and females will be infected with HPV in their lifetime. Sometimes the virus will clear on its own but when that does not happen there can be severe consequences:
Human papillomavirus (HPV) affects both females and males. HPV transmission can happen with any kind of genital contact with someone who has HPV—intercourse isn’t necessary.
Many people who have HPV don’t even know it, because the virus often has no signs or symptoms. That means you can get the virus or pass it on to your partner without knowing it.
In the United States, an estimated 75% to 80% of males and females will be infected with HPV in their lifetime. For most, the virus will clear on its own, but when it doesn’t, HPV can severe and sometimes fatal have consequences:
genital warts (men and women), and
cancers of the cervix, vagina, and vulva.

Source: Centers for Disease Control 2010